http://www.huttcity.govt.nz/Documents/projects/Draft%20Urban%20Forest%20Plan/Urban%20Forest%20Plan.pdf

The urban forest provides a wide range of benefits which are essential to the health and function of the City today and into the future.  It is our pleasure to present the Draft version of Council’s first Urban Forest Plan. It’s now time for people to let Council know whether the document is going to provide the right direction for Council’s Urban Forest. The City’s Urban Forest is a great responsibility and if we manage it well will bring us and future residents tremendous benefits. As it exists today, the urban forest provides a wonderful foundation which can be enhanced over time in a strategic way.

Our urban forest is attractive in its own right BUT it also provides us with vital services – climate control, habitat, biodiversity, soil conservation, water quality conservation, carbon sequestration, gas and nutrient cycling. Overseas studies also point out the importance of urban forests in terms of improved property values, community well being and recreation opportunities. The urban forest provides a seasonal indicator. Elements of our urban forest have important historical and cultural associations.

“Trees are a symbol of endurance and are paramount in our lives. They must be planted and handed over intact from generation to generation.” Ron Flook, 1932 – 2006

The document outlines the components of our urban forest and proposes methods for maintaining and improving the forest in order to offer the city more benefits. Let’s aim for a sustainable forest where, even though our urban forest depends on human intervention, outputs far exceed inputs. Let’s manage the naturally occurring and planted trees to provide the City and Region with enhanced ecological, environmental, community and amenity benefits.

HCC looks forward to receiving your comments, which will be used to improve this draft.

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footDews Construction have completed the work on the footpath & crossing at Moana Road. Hit with some miserable weather over the past 6 weeks, the crew of Stuart, Adrian, Matt and Tipi did a superb job whilst being mindful of allowing access to the Cafes & shops with a minimum of disruption. This “initiative” came from the Eastbourne Community Board when visiting the site with HCC staff.  The ECB asked for a solution to the crossing problem. HCC suggested a new crossing would be safer and faster and an extended footpath could help the retailers.  HCC approached the local businesses with a very generous “cost sharing” proposal allowing the benefit of superb dining space in front of the Cafes.

wc demoEnd of an era? The final chapter in the refurbishment of the Changing Sheds – the removal of the old toilet block.

Planting at Windy Point

July 22, 2009

planting“In June two community work bees were held at Windy Point to weed the area and replant with native backdune species.  Over the two days a handful of hardy volunteers filled half a jumbo bin with Climbing Dock, a scrambling vine with many tubers. Where lots of tubers were dug out the new coastal shrubs have no natural cover to help them get established.

It’s an opportunity to experiment and measure success or failure. Three sites were planted to determine how the natives would cope in a totally cleared area, an uncleared area which is free of climbing doc, and an uncleared area where climbing doc is present. Dr David  Bergin, a coastal plant expert, oversaw the planting and will monitor the trial site.
Another  community planting will be held in the coming months to fill the remaining gaps. Here’s hoping the plants grow well and the area becomes another showcase spot for coastal restoration in the Eastern Bays!”

plantingDr David  Bergin (coastal planting expert), Rosie Doole (HCC) & local Days Bay resident Claire Schmidt

Hutt City “volunteer planting coordinator” Rosie Doole & her assistant Carolyn Cowie have been working with groups along the Petone & Eastbourne beaches. Rosie writes:

“In June two community work bees were held at Windy Point to weed the area and replant with native backdune species.  Over the two days a handful of hardy volunteers filled half a jumbo bin with Climbing Dock, a scrambling vine with many tubers. Where lots of tubers were dug out the new coastal shrubs have no natural cover to help them get established.

It’s an opportunity to experiment and measure success or failure. Three sites were planted to determine how the natives would cope in a totally cleared area, an uncleared area which is free of climbing doc, and an uncleared area where climbing doc is present. Dr David  Bergin, a coastal plant expert, oversaw the planting and will monitor the trial site.

Another  community planting will be held in the coming months to fill the remaining gaps. Here’s hoping the plants grow well and the area becomes another showcase spot for coastal restoration in the Eastern Bays!”


seawallOne day with 12 workers & the job was done – the sea wall north of the wharf is now seriously native!

Let’s save our Bay

July 9, 2009

Don’t miss out – Days Bay AGM & superb dinner at the Cobar Wed 26 August featuring author Maggie Rainey Smith. NB all residents are invited to the AGM part of the evening 6.30pm for 7.00pm AGM. Dinner at 8pm. Dinner and entertainment tickets $55 ($60 after 12 August). Ticket sales may be limited. Book now at info@daysbay.org.nz or call 562 7200.

Newsletter 9 July 2009 (distributed to all Days Bay mailboxes) – Recent media releases (Hutt News, 30 June and the June Eastbourne Herald) report on expert opinions that suggest our inner harbour beaches are being overrun with gravel. Are we concerned? Should we try to save/restore the sandy beach that Days Bay has always been known for? If we want to try to keep sand on our beach, changes are necessary. The Days Bay Residents Association (DBRA) welcomes your views. Recent media releases (Hutt News, 30 June and the June Eastbourne Herald) report on expert opinions that suggest our inner harbour beaches are being overrun with gravel. Are we concerned? Should we try to save/restore the sandy beach that Days Bay has always been known for? If we want to try to keep sand on our beach, changes are necessary. The Days Bay Residents Association (DBRA) welcomes your views.

The story so far The article on page 5 of the June 30 edition of the Hutt News has very accurately summarised concerns held by the committee of the Days Bays Residents Association (DBRA) for a number of years. Experts appear to be unanimous in predicting that our once sandy playground and beach will soon become a thing of the past.

350 road

For some time DBRA has been conducting research into the causes of sand erosion and the build up of gravel at the beach. DBRA believes, that left unchecked, the current pattern of beach deterioration will have a negative impact on our future quality of life as residents. DBRA research to date prompts the following comment: –

• Five reports prepared for Councils since 1980, yet no action. download reports

• Gravel pulse reached Days Bay in 2007. 10 more years could see the bay filled with gravel.

• Main Road erosion has accelerated in the last two years. Council needs to use rocks/walls to protect road – the use of rocks/walls causes sand erosion.

• Council has acknowledged the difficulties associated with the lack of natural dune protection and the encroachment of gravel.

350 Eastbourne 1957 & 2008

The Gravel Pulse (nb also see Blog further down – Gravel moving into the Bay by John Butt. Aug 2008) Photos above are of Eastbourne’s southern beach – showing the changes over the past few decades. These images demonstrate the Gravel Pulse moving in a north direction. The Gravel Pulse reached Days Bay in 2007. Within 10 years, Days Bay could be filled with gravel. In recent years the beach at Days Bay has become thickly covered in small gravel at the south end. Because of the erosion of sand at the north end, the road is threatened. Council has constructed a retaining wall in an attempt to stop the undermining of the road. Expert opinion indicates that the presence of retaining walls will hasten the disappearance of sand from the beach. The solution to the problem proposed by the experts is a return to the cultivation of sand dunes. The development of dunes is only possible if the road is moved from its present position adjacent to the beach. If the road is to be relocated an opportunity is created to make a natural connection from the beach to the park area by reintroduction of a sand dune area.

If both these events occur it then becomes necessary to re-design the current Williams Park landscape and upgrade amenities where appropriate.

DBRA has considered the following options:
1 – do nothing
2 – plant dunes
3 – replenish sand from offshore or elsewhere
4 – re-locate the road to rear of Williams Park
Options 2-4 could be considered simultaneously. Option 4 represents major change. As announced at last year’s AGM the DBRA has been giving consideration to a “what if ” concept that would see re-routing of the road together with a revamp for Williams Park and the beach. To aid the in visualisation of a “what if ” concept, DBRA submits a sketch plan for residents to consider.
350 scheme

1 – no change to road, some sense of “gateway” into Days Bay. Keep existing parking
2 – extend dune/native planting area to encompass existing Wellesley driveway
3 – move Wellesley entrance to align with . . . 5
4 – replace bus parking lost in 2 for access to Wellesley
5 – seaside park opens onto Days Bay . . . parking to road and offers unimpeded access to the beach
6 – “soccer field” – same as existing, “moved” to be by the sea
7 – retain existing bush and move footpath to inland side of road – access to 12
8 – “new” Pavilion building directly opposite wharf
9 – family picnic area, trees and grass, children able to run straight onto beach
10 – remove duck pond, possible replaced by “water play” area for small children nearer beach
11 – possible position for pedestrian crossing (underpass). Macrocarpa trees stay with planting around as Kereru Road lower area closed to traffic – just pedestrian access parking to tennis courts, etc.
12 – no change to this park but may have to move pumping station?
13 – existing changing rooms/wc back onto Pavilion park
14 – north Days Bay links to park and beach via overbridge (think “city to sea” but smaller) – big steps on park side to sit and watch soccer – main access for Wellesley to park & wharf.

DBRA is concerned about these issues and has a vision for the future of Days Bay. Local residents may not share some of these views but DBRA welcomes comment & encourages discussion from all residents and any other interested parties. Comments may be made below or sent to info@daysbay.org.nz or c/o DBRA Secretary, 614 Marine Drive, Days Bay.